Insect Cabochon Honey Bee Apis mellifera Oval 18x25 mm Clear 2 pieces Lot For Sale

Insect Cabochon Honey Bee Apis mellifera Oval 18x25 mm Clear 2 pieces Lot


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Insect Cabochon Honey Bee Apis mellifera Oval 18x25 mm Clear 2 pieces Lot:
$11

  • 18x25 mm cabochon (clear)
  • -- 2 pieces lot
  • Real Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) specimen encased in clear lucite material. The specimen is crystal clear, indestructible and transparent.
  • Safe, authentic and completely unbreakable product put real Spider right at your of theBee body is 1.2 cm. (0.5 inch).
  • Size of thelucite block is 18x25x12 mm (0.7x1.0x0.5 inch).
  • Weight of thelucite block is 4 g and 20 g withpacking box.
  • It can be used for rings, pendants, bracelets and other crafts. And it is also is a very good collectible item for every body.
  • 18x25 mm cabochon (clear)

    -- 2 pieces lot


    Real Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) specimen encased in clear lucite material. The specimen is crystal clear, indestructible and transparent.

    Safe, authentic and completely unbreakable product put real Spider right at your fingertips!

    Length of theBee body is 1.2 cm. (0.5 inch).

    Size of thelucite block is 18x25x12 mm (0.7x1.0x0.5 inch).

    Weight of thelucite block is 4 g and 20 g withpacking box.

    It can be used for rings, pendants, bracelets and other crafts. And it is also is a very good collectible item for every body.

    This is a handmade real animal specimen craft. Each one will be a bit different (specimen size, color and posture) even in the same production batch.
    The pictures in the listing are just for reference as we are selling multiple pieces with same Bee - Apis mellifera

    The Western honey bee or European honey bee (Apis mellifera) is a species of honey bee. This species was introduced to China from early 20th century and has been raised widely around the country.

    In the temperate zone, honey bees survive winter as a colony, and the queen begins egg laying in mid to late winter, to prepare for spring. This is most likely triggered by longer day length. She is the only fertile female, and deposits all the eggs from which the other bees are produced. Except a brief mating period when she may make several flights to mate with drones, or if she leaves in later life with a swarm to establish a new colony, the queen rarely leaves the hive after the larvae have become full grown bees. The queen deposits each egg in a cell prepared by the worker bees. The egg hatches into a small larva which is fed by nurse bees (worker bees who maintain the interior of the colony). After about a week, the larva is sealed up in its cell by the nurse bees and begins the pupal stage. After another week, it will emerge an adult bee.

    For the first ten days of their lives, the female worker bees clean the hive and feed the larvae. After this, they begin building comb cells. On days 16 through 20, a worker receives nectar and pollen from older workers and stores it. After the 20th day, a worker leaves the hive and spends the remainder of its life as a forager. The population of a healthy hive in mid-summer can average between 40,000 and 80,000 bees.

    Pupae of drones

    The larvae and pupae in a frame of honeycomb are referred to as frames of brood and are often sold (with adhering bees) by beekeepers to other beekeepers to start new beehives.

    Stages of development of the drone pupae

    Both workers and queens are fed "royal jelly" during the first three days of the larval stage. Then workers are switched to a diet of pollen and nectar or diluted honey, while those intended for queens will continue to receive royal jelly. This causes the larva to develop to the pupa stage more quickly, while being also larger and fully developed sexually. Queen breeders consider good nutrition during the larval stage to be of critical importance to the quality of the queens raised, good genetics and sufficient number of matings also being factors. During the larval and pupal stages, various parasites can attack the pupa/larva and destroy or damage it.

    Queens are not raised in the typical horizontal brood cells of the honeycomb. The typical queen cell is specially constructed to be much larger, and has a vertical orientation. However, should the workers sense that the old queen is weakening, they will produce emergency cells known as supersedure cells. These cells are made from a cell with an egg or very young larva. These cells protrude from the comb. As the queen finishes her larval feeding, and pupates, she moves into a head downward position, from which she will later chew her way out of the cell. At pupation the workers cap or seal the cell. Just prior to emerging from their cells, young queens can often be heard "piping." The purpose of this sound is not yet fully understood.

    Bee Swarm- bees are remarkably non aggressive in this state as they have no hive to protect, and can be captured with ease

    Worker bees are infertile females; but in some circumstances, generally only in times of severe stress or with the loss or injury or declining health of the queen, they may lay infertile eggs, and in some subspecies these eggs may actually be fertile. However, since the worker bees are 'imperfect' (not fully sexually developed) females, they do not mate with drones. Any fertile eggs that they lay would be haploid, having only the genetic contribution of their mother, and in honey bees these haploid eggs will always develop into drones. Worker bees also secrete the wax used to build the hive, clean and maintain the hive, raise the young, guard the hive and forage for nectar and pollen.

    In honey bees, the worker bees have a modified ovipositor called a stinger with which they can sting to defend the hive, but unlike other bees of any other genus (and even unlike the queens of their own species), the stinger is barbed. Contrary to popular belief, the bee will not always die soon after stinging: this is a misconception based on the fact that a bee will usually die after stinging a human or other mammal. The sting and associated venom sac are modified so as to pull free of the body once lodged (autotomy), and the sting apparatus has its own musculature and ganglion which allow it to keep delivering venom once detached. It is presumed that this complex apparatus, including the barbs on the sting, evolved specifically in response to predation by vertebrates, as the barbs do not function (and the sting apparatus does not detach) unless the sting is embedded in elastic material. Even then, the barbs do not always "catch", so a bee may occasionally pull the sting free and either fly off unharmed, or sting again.

    Drone bees are the male bees of the colony. Since they do not have ovipositors, they also do not have stingers. Drone honeybees do not forage for nectar or pollen. In some species, drones are suspected of playing a contributing role in the temperature regulation of the hive. The primary purpose of a drone bee is to fertilize a new queen. Multiple drones will mate with any given queen in flight, and each drone will die immediately after mating; the process of insemination requires a lethally convulsive effort. Drone honey bees are haploid (having single, unpaired chromosomes) in their genetic structure and are descended only from their mother, the queen. They truly do not have a father. In essence, drones are the equivalent of flying gametes. In regions of temperate climate, the drones are generally expelled from the hive before winter and die of cold and starvation, since they are unable to forage or produce honey or take care of themselves.

    The average lifespan of the queen in most subspecies is three to four years. However, there are reports that in the German/European Black Bee subspecies that was previously used for beekeeping, the queen was said to live 7 to 8 years or more.[citation needed] Because queens successively run out of sperm, towards the end of their life they start laying more and more unfertilized eggs. Beekeepers therefore frequently change queen every or every other year.

    The lifespan of the workers vary drastically over the year in places with an extended winter. Workers born in the spring will work hard and live only a few weeks, whereas those born in the autumn will stay inside for several months as the colony hibernates.


    Item SpecificsMaterial ResinType OrnamentCountry of Manufacture ChinaCountry/Region of Manufacture ChinaHandmade YesModified Item NoAnimal Class Bee
    Payment

    Payment: By Paypal

    Shipping cost

    Free shipping cost.

    We send the goods to USA, Canada, UK, Australia, New Zealand, EU countries and some other European and Asian countries by E-express, a kind of fast postal service by Hong Kong Post. It usually takes about 6 to 10 working days for delivery.

    We send the goods to other countries by registered airmail and will take about 8 to 14 working days for delivery.

    Return policy

    Returns: We accept returns with any reason in 30 days. Buyer will bear the return shipping cost.

    Messages

    We will answer messages in 24 hours during working days.

    [ Policy: This is the contents of your policies.You can add a banner for this policy as header and add text descriptions here. The text descriptions can be different Font Size, Font Color, Style and even graphics and icons are also accepted. ]

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    Insect Cabochon Honey Bee Apis mellifera Oval 18x25 mm Clear 2 pieces Lot

    18x25 mm cabochon (clear)

    -- 2 pieces lot


    Real Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) specimen encased in clear lucite material. The specimen is crystal clear, indestructible and transparent.

    Safe, authentic and completely unbreakable product put real Spider right at your fingertips!

    Length of theBee body is 1.2 cm. (0.5 inch).

    Size of thelucite block is 18x25x12 mm (0.7x1.0x0.5 inch).

    Weight of thelucite block is 4 g and 20 g withpacking box.

    It can be used for rings, pendants, bracelets and other crafts. And it is also is a very good collectible item for every body.

    This is a handmade real animal specimen craft. Each one will be a bit different (specimen size, color and posture) even in the same production batch.
    The pictures in the listing are just for reference as we are selling multiple pieces with same Bee - Apis mellifera

    The Western honey bee or European honey bee (Apis mellifera) is a species of honey bee. This species was introduced to China from early 20th century and has been raised widely around the country.

    In the temperate zone, honey bees survive winter as a colony, and the queen begins egg laying in mid to late winter, to prepare for spring. This is most likely triggered by longer day length. She is the only fertile female, and deposits all the eggs from which the other bees are produced. Except a brief mating period when she may make several flights to mate with drones, or if she leaves in later life with a swarm to establish a new colony, the queen rarely leaves the hive after the larvae have become full grown bees. The queen deposits each egg in a cell prepared by the worker bees. The egg hatches into a small larva which is fed by nurse bees (worker bees who maintain the interior of the colony). After about a week, the larva is sealed up in its cell by the nurse bees and begins the pupal stage. After another week, it will emerge an adult bee.

    For the first ten days of their lives, the female worker bees clean the hive and feed the larvae. After this, they begin building comb cells. On days 16 through 20, a worker receives nectar and pollen from older workers and stores it. After the 20th day, a worker leaves the hive and spends the remainder of its life as a forager. The population of a healthy hive in mid-summer can average between 40,000 and 80,000 bees.

    Pupae of drones

    The larvae and pupae in a frame of honeycomb are referred to as frames of brood and are often sold (with adhering bees) by beekeepers to other beekeepers to start new beehives.

    Stages of development of the drone pupae

    Both workers and queens are fed "royal jelly" during the first three days of the larval stage. Then workers are switched to a diet of pollen and nectar or diluted honey, while those intended for queens will continue to receive royal jelly. This causes the larva to develop to the pupa stage more quickly, while being also larger and fully developed sexually. Queen breeders consider good nutrition during the larval stage to be of critical importance to the quality of the queens raised, good genetics and sufficient number of matings also being factors. During the larval and pupal stages, various parasites can attack the pupa/larva and destroy or damage it.

    Queens are not raised in the typical horizontal brood cells of the honeycomb. The typical queen cell is specially constructed to be much larger, and has a vertical orientation. However, should the workers sense that the old queen is weakening, they will produce emergency cells known as supersedure cells. These cells are made from a cell with an egg or very young larva. These cells protrude from the comb. As the queen finishes her larval feeding, and pupates, she moves into a head downward position, from which she will later chew her way out of the cell. At pupation the workers cap or seal the cell. Just prior to emerging from their cells, young queens can often be heard "piping." The purpose of this sound is not yet fully understood.

    Bee Swarm- bees are remarkably non aggressive in this state as they have no hive to protect, and can be captured with ease

    Worker bees are infertile females; but in some circumstances, generally only in times of severe stress or with the loss or injury or declining health of the queen, they may lay infertile eggs, and in some subspecies these eggs may actually be fertile. However, since the worker bees are 'imperfect' (not fully sexually developed) females, they do not mate with drones. Any fertile eggs that they lay would be haploid, having only the genetic contribution of their mother, and in honey bees these haploid eggs will always develop into drones. Worker bees also secrete the wax used to build the hive, clean and maintain the hive, raise the young, guard the hive and forage for nectar and pollen.

    In honey bees, the worker bees have a modified ovipositor called a stinger with which they can sting to defend the hive, but unlike other bees of any other genus (and even unlike the queens of their own species), the stinger is barbed. Contrary to popular belief, the bee will not always die soon after stinging: this is a misconception based on the fact that a bee will usually die after stinging a human or other mammal. The sting and associated venom sac are modified so as to pull free of the body once lodged (autotomy), and the sting apparatus has its own musculature and ganglion which allow it to keep delivering venom once detached. It is presumed that this complex apparatus, including the barbs on the sting, evolved specifically in response to predation by vertebrates, as the barbs do not function (and the sting apparatus does not detach) unless the sting is embedded in elastic material. Even then, the barbs do not always "catch", so a bee may occasionally pull the sting free and either fly off unharmed, or sting again.

    Drone bees are the male bees of the colony. Since they do not have ovipositors, they also do not have stingers. Drone honeybees do not forage for nectar or pollen. In some species, drones are suspected of playing a contributing role in the temperature regulation of the hive. The primary purpose of a drone bee is to fertilize a new queen. Multiple drones will mate with any given queen in flight, and each drone will die immediately after mating; the process of insemination requires a lethally convulsive effort. Drone honey bees are haploid (having single, unpaired chromosomes) in their genetic structure and are descended only from their mother, the queen. They truly do not have a father. In essence, drones are the equivalent of flying gametes. In regions of temperate climate, the drones are generally expelled from the hive before winter and die of cold and starvation, since they are unable to forage or produce honey or take care of themselves.

    The average lifespan of the queen in most subspecies is three to four years. However, there are reports that in the German/European Black Bee subspecies that was previously used for beekeeping, the queen was said to live 7 to 8 years or more.[citation needed] Because queens successively run out of sperm, towards the end of their life they start laying more and more unfertilized eggs. Beekeepers therefore frequently change queen every or every other year.

    The lifespan of the workers vary drastically over the year in places with an extended winter. Workers born in the spring will work hard and live only a few weeks, whereas those born in the autumn will stay inside for several months as the colony hibernates.

    Item SpecificsMaterial :ResinType :OrnamentCountry of Manufacture :ChinaCountry/Region of Manufacture :ChinaHandmade :YesModified Item :NoAnimal Class :Bee
    Payment

    Payment: By Paypal

    Shipping cost

    Free shipping cost.

    We send the goods to USA, Canada, UK, Australia, New Zealand, EU countries and some other European and Asian countries by E-express, a kind of fast postal service by Hong Kong Post. It usually takes about 6 to 10 working days for delivery.

    We send the goods to other countries by registered airmail and will take about 8 to 14 working days for delivery.

    Return policy

    Returns: We accept returns with any reason in 30 days. Buyer will bear the return shipping cost.

    Messages

    We will answer messages in 24 hours during working days.

    [ Policy: This is the contents of your policies.You can add a banner for this policy as header and add text descriptions here. The text descriptions can be different Font Size, Font Color, Style and even graphics and icons are also accepted. ]


    Copyright of XXXXX. All right reserved.


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