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#21256 05/04/07 10:03 PM
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DNA test shows heart attack risk

An Icelandic company announced the move after the publication of new research linking specific parts of the genetic code with heart attacks and cardiovascular disease

Researchers identified a short stretch of DNA containing "letters" of code more common in people who have suffered heart disease, or had a heart attack.
Two separate Canadian and European-led teams reported their findings in the journal Science.

The Reykjavik-based biotech company deCODE, whose scientists were at the forefront of the research, said it now intended to produce a genetic test for myocardial infarction (MI), or heart attack.

A statement from the company said: "DeCODE plans to bundle this discovery with other genetic variants it has linked to risk of heart attack into a DNA-based test for gauging inherited risk of MI. The company believes that such a test, particularly for those with other risk factors, may enable individuals and their doctors to adopt more informed and thus potentially more effective prevention regimes."

The research involving sifting through many thousands of DNA samples searching for chemical letters, arranged in pairs on the twin strands of the DNA molecule, that might be linked to heart conditions.
Both teams were drawn to the same region of DNA on chromosome 9, one of the bundles of DNA numbered one to 22 found in every cell.

A Canadian-led study found that people with matching copies of two particular letters at this spot were 30% to 40% more at risk of heart disease than those with no copies. DeCODE's scientists discovered that heart attack risk was increased by more than 60% in individuals with matching copies of another letter in the same locality. The scientists have not found a gene, only pieces of DNA that appear to influence susceptibility.

Genes are sequences of DNA which provide the coded instructions for making proteins. The DNA region in question hosts no known genes, but is next to two catalogued anti-cancer genes. Other DNA variants in the same general region have recently been shown to raise the risk of type 2 diabetes.

http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,20867,21670253-601,00.html



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"You will never find a real Human being - Even in a mirror." ....Mike Kremer.


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Thanks Mike. A couple of things especially interesting. For example:

"people with matching copies of two particular letters at this spot"

Means it's basically a recessive gene, although just one or two bases hardly makes a gene. Another one:

"but is next to two catalogued anti-cancer genes"

Seems, once again, that a gene that aids one thing has a downside for something else. It's all a delicate balancing act.

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Originally Posted By: terrytnewzealand
Thanks Mike. A couple of things especially interesting...............
Means it's basically a recessive gene, although just one or two bases hardly makes a gene. Another one:
"but is next to two catalogued anti-cancer genes"

Seems, once again, that a gene that aids one thing has a downside for something else. It's all a delicate balancing act.

You are so right Terry.
There is always a 'downside' to every 'upside'

S'why I dont believe we should 'antagonise/mess' with Nature.

But, using Nature to help repair and recover, stem-cell, and gene therapy could be the long term answers, rather than
'Biotics and chemical medicines?

Mike Kremer

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Mike wrote:

"S'why I dont believe we should 'antagonise/mess' with Nature."

I think I've mentioned before my father always used to say, "you can fight nature but the best you can hope for is to come second". Stem cell research will be useful but again there will be a downside. Big companies and governments will promote the technology for not necessarily noble purposes. But we have to live with that. I'm not actually that much against gene transfer. Caution of course.

By the way it was your post "Out of Asia not Africa" that brought me here. I had a quick look at it again. I think we chased anyman away with it.

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Originally Posted By: Mike Kremer
But, using Nature to help repair and recover, stem-cell, and gene therapy could be the long term answers, rather than
'Biotics and chemical medicines?

Mike Kremer


Speaking of chemical medicines...(re: the other post).

But seriously, can I quote you on that? "But, using Nature to help repair and recover...."

What a neat idea....

I have to say, i don't see much difference between the stem/genes stuff and the "chemical medicines" of which antibiotics are too.

It is all manipulation. I will admit that the stem/gene stuff is much more specific and targeted, as opposed to the old shotgun approach of early (and present) chemicals meds.

Much of gene therapy will involve manipulating the existing genetic stuff (with small chemicals), and not so much the sci.fi. stuff of transferring genes. I am speaking just of human medical therapy stuff only here, not other applications where sci.fi stuff is more prevelant.

Anyway, some new medicine is focusing on manipulating the microenvironments where "disease" develops, and affecting a change with targeted chemicals to shift things toward the more healthy side of things.

I don't like what the PharmCo's do to society, but they sure do some interesting research.

~SA



Pyrolysis creates reduced carbon! ...Time for the next step in our evolutionary symbiosis with fire.

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