CIVIL WAR LETTER - 66th Illinois Infantry - Picks Attacked Guerrillas in Corinth For Sale



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CIVIL WAR LETTER - 66th Illinois Infantry - Picks Attacked Guerrillas in Corinth:
$79.88

Civil War LetterCivil War letter written by soldier in Company "G" of the 66th Illinois Infantry - known as the "Squirrel Tail Brigade." This Civil War soldier letter was written by John (“Jack”) T. Hargadine of Casstown, Miami county, Ohio, who enlisted at the age of 41 in October 1861 in Co. G, 66th Illinois Infantry—sometimes called “the Squirrel Tail Brigade” or Birge’s Western Sharpshooters. At the time of his enlistment he was described as standing a shade under six feet tall, with black hair and gray eyes. His occupation was given at “Butcher.” Jack was married in 1843 to Ellen Muter (1817-1890) and had at least two daughters before he enlisted.Hargadine family records indicate that Jack initially enlisted in the 1st Sharpshooter Company was taken in the 66th Illinois as Co. G (or H), “Western Sharpshooters.” He remained with the regiment for three years, mustering out at Chattanooga in September 1864.Western Sharp ShootersJohn T. Hargadine, died 10 November 1883 at the age of 68.TranscriptionCamp Davies 1 April 16th 1863Well friends, I received a letter from you yesterday the 15th and was glad to hear from you and you said that you was all well and that was good news to me and I can say to that I am well at present with the exception of a sore mouth but that is a common thing here with us and the rest of the boys is well and hearty. And I hope when you get these few lines, they may find you all well and all the rest of the Cass[town] folks and all the country folks.Well you told me about your election and that was a heavy old time, I suppose, in Cass for I can imagine just how they went the thing. I suppose there was old electioneering for I know that they all wanted their office that they run for and I hope they all got it. But we don’t have to bother ourselves anymore about such things for we are all elected for three years and I don’t think that there will be any danger of us being put out in that time.Well, you say that mother had her fortune told and I suppose that the old lady got well for the money but I am afraid that she has missed some things. In the first place, I am not so poor as I might be for I am only 11 pounds lighter than I was when I left Dayton and in the next place, I am afraid that she has missed the time for me to come home for the chances look doubtful at this time. And then she said that I would give my life to get home and I know that is not so for when I come home, I don’t want to be dead. So in the next place I don’t think that she knows anything about it. But that will do for Cass to believe but it won’t do for a sharp shooter to believe.Well, the health of our camp is good. We have been here about 5 months and have not had one man to die with sickness yet, and there is only 6 in the hospital at this time and they—most of them—has got sore eyes.Well, we are bothered some with some guerrillas. Our pickets was attacked last evening after dark but none of them was hurt. They just fired a few shots and then run and that is the way they do their fighting so it gives our men a bad chance to do anything with them. But we get a few of them every few days. Well, there was another big scouting party left Corinth yesterday but I did not go this time. Our doctor and two of our ambulances went. I suppose it will be a ten day scout.Well, I would like to see you all but I don’t know how it will be for they don’t think that a poor private wants to see their families but it may be that we will get a chance some time and if we don’t, it won’t be our faults. Tell Libb tat there was two little girls came in camp today. I thought that it was her and some other little girl and I went to see and they was both black girls.Well, I must quit but give my respects to all that ask after me and tell George Burton to take good care of his new wife and don’t forget me. The weather is fine here and we have got plenty to eat such as it is, and it is good enough, what there is of it.Tell John Relaford that I would like for him to write to me and tell me how things is. No more at present but write soon. — John Hargadine1 Camp Davies was a Union outpost located south of Corinth on the Tuscumbia Hills overlooking the Tuscumbia river, approximately 1 mile from the Mobile & Ohio Railroad. The camp was stockaded with 13 foot high wooded walls. It stood until January 1864 when the entire camp was put to the torch by the Union army when it vacated the area.TERMS$3.00 postage in the United States. We accept Paypal.Postage combined for multiple purchases. Please wait for me to send the invoice, otherwise you will pay a higher rate.For International buyers, we utilize ’s Global Shipping Program. We had too many packages sent via the post office go missing. So we believe this program will be safer for us and for you.We are members of the American Philatelic Society, the U.S. Philatelic Classics Society, the Confederate Stamp Alliance and the Illinois Postal History Society.We only sell genuine, original letters (no copies or reproductions). Some of our letters have been transcribed and nicely presented for future genealogists and history buffs on the Spared & Shared blog. We have been selling on since 1998. offer WITH CONFIDENCE !


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