Science Night at my work

Posted by: TheFallibleFiend

Science Night at my work - 03/31/09 05:16 PM

Tonight's the night. Been planning this for months. This is our 4th year. We put together exhibits; some from our employees and others from invited experts (NASA, American Statistical Association, local universities, NIH scientists, etc). Presentations are on statistics, energy, optical illusions, evolution, among others.

We only have about 12 exhibits this year, but I think they're pretty good. Last year we had over 200 students (plus parents, teachers, and administrators).

A lot of times, kids don't see the fun of science. Some few of them don't ever actually learn what science is - they know the word, but they understand so little of it that's it's indistinguishable from magic to them.

It's one of many things we do to help the local school system. I'm involved, because I'm a coordinator for educational outreach, but everyone should be interested in this - how do we get kids interested in the real article (hopefully before their brains are hijacked by pseudoscience)?


Posted by: redewenur

Re: Science Night at my work - 04/01/09 11:14 AM

"..but they understand so little of it that's it's indistinguishable from magic to them."

Yes, I know exactly how they feel. there was a time when I thought I understood it smile

"how do we get kids interested in the real article"

How about making connections between sci-fi and the real thing? Carl Sagan and many other scientists were, I believe, strongly inspired by sci-fi in their early years. Kids love a good story. It might excite them if they can see how these wonderful ideas might be realized through science - how many of these things can be real, if they try to make it so.

Then again, experiments may grab the attention of many kids. To predict an outcome, then to see that predicted outcome realized, as though by magic. Then to explain how it works - how isn't magic but science.
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: Science Night at my work - 04/29/09 02:11 PM

I think this sounds like a great program. Can you tell me what role the American Statistical Association played in the program?