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#33523 - 03/03/10 10:25 AM climate change and agriculture
dhaval
Unregistered


In a global warming climate change and agriculture are related with each other. global warming effected to agriculture with temperature, oxygen, carbon dioxide.That type of condition effect human and animal also for food and leave.

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#33833 - 04/04/10 12:02 AM Re: climate change and agriculture [Re: ]
samwik Offline
Megastar

Registered: 10/10/06
Posts: 1164
Loc: Colorado
I think agriculture affects the climate much more than climate affects agriculture. Weather affects agriculture, but agriculture has globally released half of the carbon stored in our planet's fragile, "recently" evolved and generated, soils.

How we manage our soils will determine the future of our climate.

(citations available upon request).

~SA
_________________________
Pyrolysis creates reduced carbon! ...Time for the next step in our evolutionary symbiosis with fire.

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#33838 - 04/04/10 02:17 AM Re: climate change and agriculture [Re: samwik]
Ellis Offline
Megastar

Registered: 01/08/07
Posts: 1490
Loc: Australia
Perhaps it is the heedless decisions that we humans make about agriculture that is the problem. Thus we grow palm oil where once there was rain forest, we cultivate cotton and rice in unsuitable areas such as Australia, we clear wooded land to plant fields of wheat, or fodder for our food animals, we chop down old-growth forests to provide wood-chips for paper or chop-sticks- and then we water these farming ventures by irrigation that brings salt to the surface of the soil rendering it useless!

Even if there were no Climate Change our past and current practices are destroying the soil, which as you say Sam, is fragile.

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#34360 - 05/13/10 05:33 AM Re: climate change and agriculture [Re: ]
degenerationxxx
Unregistered


The rise in global temperature owing to climate change will affect agriculture in strikingly different ways in the lower and higher latitudes. While in temperate latitudes a rise in temperature will help developed countries increase food productivity, it will have adverse effects in India and other countries in the tropics. The summer monsoon, which accounts for nearly 75 per cent of India’s rainfall, is critical for agriculture. Climate change is likely to intensify the variability of summer monsoon dynamics, leading to a rise in extreme events such as increased precipitation and heightened flood risks in some parts of the country and reduced rainfall and prolonged drought in other areas. A World Bank report on climate change impact based on case studies in India has focussed on drought-prone regions of Andhra Pradesh and Maharashtra, and flood-prone districts in Orissa on the edge of climate tolerance limits. It highlights the possibility of the yields of major dry land crops declining in Andhra Pradesh. Sugarcane farmers of Maharashtra may see yields go down by as much as 30 per cent. Rice production in Orissa will face a similar fate with yields in the flood-prone coastal regions dropping by12 per cent.

Poor and marginal farmers who own less than one acre of land mostly populate these regions. There is an urgent need to evolve comprehensive climate resilience strategies that must factor in risk assessment, better water management, developing varieties that can do well in stressful conditions, and bringing about certain changes in agricultural practices. Many organisations are already working to develop drought-resistant and saline-resistant crop varieties for the arid regions, and rainfall-tolerant and short-duration varieties for flood-prone regions. But greater and sustained government support for agricultural research will be vital. At the same time, the government must persuade farmers to take better advantage of the dry rabi season in the flood-prone regions, and also help them supplement their income through non-farm activities such as aquaculture. It may take many years for the devastating effects of climate change on agriculture to be felt fully but the time for bold government and public action is now.
=====================


Edited by Amaranth Rose II (05/13/10 08:09 AM)

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#34373 - 05/13/10 05:25 PM Re: climate change and agriculture [Re: ]
Mike Kremer Offline

Megastar

Registered: 10/16/04
Posts: 1696
Loc: London UK
Originally Posted By: degenerationxxx
The rise in global temperature owing to climate change will affect agriculture in strikingly different ways in the lower and higher latitudes. While in temperate latitudes a rise in temperature will help developed countries increase food productivity, it will have adverse effects in India and other countries in the tropics.......................................> A World Bank report on climate change impact based on case studies in India has focussed on drought-prone regions of Andhra Pradesh and Maharashtra, and flood-prone districts in Orissa on the edge of climate tolerance limits.
..........................................>Poor and marginal farmers who own less than one acre of land mostly populate these regions. There is an urgent need to evolve comprehensive climate resilience strategies that must factor in risk assessment, better water management, developing varieties that can do well in stressful conditions,..............................> and bringing about certain changes in agricultural practices. Many organisations are already working to develop drought-resistant crops .............................>but the time for bold government and public action is now.
=====================


Originally Posted By: Mike Kremer

Welcome degenerationxxx, Yes you are absolutely right.
Something will need to be done.
The huge Indian Continent with its increasing population will need to be fed.
This increasing population means that Indian family farms are becoming smaller and smaller, resulting in inefficiency. Renting out the small family patch and heading for the big citys is becoming the normal practice all over the world. Your Goverment is buying up the small holdings where it can, allowing larger mechanised farming Companys to produce the food.
And as you mention, higher temperatures, can mean lower rainfall in parts of India.Which is why India is now building, two or three very large Dams, on rivers which rise in Pakistan and may become a source of friction between the two countries? The huge Sawalcot dam in occupied Kashmir might be another future problem.When it comes to water and food growing....everybody needs to be friends.
_________________________
.

.
"You will never find a real Human being - Even in a mirror." ....Mike Kremer.



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#34376 - 05/14/10 05:45 AM Re: climate change and agriculture [Re: Mike Kremer]
kallog Offline
Megastar

Registered: 03/17/10
Posts: 1100

Did everyone overlook the poor folks in Canada, China, Russia, Mongolia, and Alaska who'll be sitting on enormous areas of newly fertile land but not have enough people to farm it? What a tragedy, all the best food-growing regions sitting idle, while people keep packing themselves into the most uninhabitable parts of the world. Somehow unaware of the bounty waiting for them to just walk in and take.




Edited by kallog (05/14/10 05:45 AM)

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#41004 - 10/16/11 09:14 AM Re: climate change and agriculture [Re: ]
samwik Offline
Megastar

Registered: 10/10/06
Posts: 1164
Loc: Colorado
Originally Posted By: degenerationxxx
The rise in global temperature owing to climate change will affect agriculture in strikingly different ways in the lower and higher latitudes. While in temperate latitudes a rise in temperature will help developed countries increase food productivity, it will have adverse effects in India and other countries in the tropics. The summer monsoon, which accounts for nearly 75 per cent of India’s rainfall, is critical for agriculture. Climate change is likely to intensify the variability of summer monsoon dynamics, leading to a rise in extreme events such as increased precipitation and heightened flood risks in some parts of the country and reduced rainfall and prolonged drought in other areas. A World Bank report on climate change impact based on case studies in India has focussed on drought-prone regions of Andhra Pradesh and Maharashtra, and flood-prone districts in Orissa on the edge of climate tolerance limits. It highlights the possibility of the yields of major dry land crops declining in Andhra Pradesh. Sugarcane farmers of Maharashtra may see yields go down by as much as 30 per cent. Rice production in Orissa will face a similar fate with yields in the flood-prone coastal regions dropping by12 per cent.

Poor and marginal farmers who own less than one acre of land mostly populate these regions. There is an urgent need to evolve comprehensive climate resilience strategies that must factor in risk assessment, better water management, developing varieties that can do well in stressful conditions, and bringing about certain changes in agricultural practices. Many organisations are already working to develop drought-resistant and saline-resistant crop varieties for the arid regions, and rainfall-tolerant and short-duration varieties for flood-prone regions. But greater and sustained government support for agricultural research will be vital. At the same time, the government must persuade farmers to take better advantage of the dry rabi season in the flood-prone regions, and also help them supplement their income through non-farm activities such as aquaculture. It may take many years for the devastating effects of climate change on agriculture to be felt fully but the time for bold government and public action is now.
=====================

Check out:

The Rhizosphere: An Ecological Perspective
Edited by Zoe G. Cardon and Julie L. Whitbeck
Hardbound, 232 Pages
Published: MAR-2007
ISBN 10: 0-12-088775-4
ISBN 13: 978-0-12-088775-0
Imprint: ACADEMIC PRESS




"As agriculture has evolved, the degree of intervention has grown steadily, culminating with the current, resource-intensive "Green Revolution" production systems where management interventions are often the dominant force shaping agroecosystem structure and function." --p.128


"The unintended consequences of agriculture extend well beyond agricultural landscapes and include environmental degradation and social displacement." --p.127


"The effect of cultivation on microbial community structure in bulk soil appear to be long-lasting and can still be detected years after agricultural mangement has ended." --p.132

"Many have advocated the adoption of an ecosystem-based approach that would incorporate multifunctionality as an agricultural goal and entail broad application of fundamental ecological principles to food production." --p.127


"We recognize that ultimately the transition to ecologically sound, sustainable food production systems that meet human needs will be complex and will require fundamental changes in cultural values and human societies as well as the application of ecolgical knowledge to agricultural management." --p.148
===


Finally, the scientific community is writing about this. New paradigms are placing soil as a significant player in the climate. Humus is key, and it is not as inert as the old paradigms suggested. "Larding the Lean Earth" shows how history has been driven by this lack of understanding.
===


Larding the Lean Earth: Soil and Society in Nineteenth Century America

...those were the "formative" years....
===


We need to reevaluate eco-management, in light of this new eco-knowledge.

~ smile
_________________________
Pyrolysis creates reduced carbon! ...Time for the next step in our evolutionary symbiosis with fire.

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#44550 - 08/02/12 08:56 AM Re: climate change and agriculture [Re: ]
Phillip Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 07/30/12
Posts: 6
the amount of pesticides people are using now frequently damaging drinking water. even many insects like frog which play a vital in our ecosystem is now vanishing from environment. as we are trying yo control nature, nature is giving us punishment.

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