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#16285 11/02/06 08:53 PM
Joined: Mar 2006
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Quote:
Originally posted by DA Morgan:
What you wrote is incorrect. And trying to say you were talking about something else, for example, are two hydrogen atoms bound together as H2 less strongly than two lead atoms due to their weight or mass is just digging a deeper hole.
the atoms of hydrogen have a single electron that inhabits a single shell. when excited it moves to a second shell. excite it much more and the electon leaves the shell atom completely (ionization). that shells is most stable when there are two electrons in it. 2 hydrogen can share a pair of electrons making them both stable, leaving the nucleuses with only one shell between them. that is different than the bonds of a solid vs gas or liquid.

if your going to discuss apples when the discussion is about banannas your likely to get caught by a slippery a' peel


the more man learns, the more he realises, he really does not know anything.
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#16286 11/02/06 11:33 PM
Joined: Oct 2004
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dehammer wrote:
"the atoms of hydrogen have a single electron that inhabits a single shell. when excited it moves to a second shell."

No. This is incorrect.

"excite it much more and the electon leaves the shell atom completely (ionization)."

Again no. This is incorrect.

"that shells is most stable when there are two electrons in it."

And yet again no. This is not correct.

"if your going to discuss apples when the discussion is about banannas your likely to get caught by a slippery a' peel"

and if you are going to posture that you know something of chemistry ... it would be better if you did.

These may help:
http://chemed.chem.purdue.edu/genchem/topicreview/bp/ch6/bohr.html
http://dbhs.wvusd.k12.ca.us/webdocs/Electrons/Hydrogen-Spectrum.html
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/hyde.html
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/bohr.html
http://www.tau.ac.il/~phchlab/experiments/hydrogen/hydrogen_atom.html

The second link is for school children K-12 so you might want to start there.


DA Morgan
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